Women We Love: Irish Singer-Songwriter, Blaithín Carney

Blaithin Carney

How did you make your dreams to become a singer a reality?

I was always very disciplined, which you have to be as a musician. Being good at your instrument requires hours and hours of practice on your own time and time again.

Once the work was done, I focused on what I wanted to achieve and went after it. Having the right team in place is essential also. I have the A- team working with me, so I feel very lucky.

The music industry is notoriously difficult to succeed in. What challenges have you had to overcome and which do you still face today?

Yes, it can be a very tricky industry, but success is relative.

I’m the kinda gal that loves a challenge, so I always keep pushing myself to be the best I can be.

I believe that if the music is good enough, the rest will follow.

I think the record industry has become too much about the bottom line and what’s on-trend, as opposed to what’s good. Art shouldn’t follow trends.

How do you think the industry needs to change to spotlight real musical talent?

There was a time in the industry when more effort was put into developing acts and helping to support them financially.

This doesn’t really exist anymore and I think they are losing a lot of really talented people because the fiscal support isn’t there.

I think the record industry has become too much about the bottom line and what’s on-trend, as opposed to what’s good. Art shouldn’t follow trends.

What’s your creative process when writing music and developing an album?

I show up at the piano everyday and write something. I might be lucky and write a song in 20 minutes, but for the most part songs take time to evolve, and you have to learn how to edit and re-edit them until the distillation is complete.

The #MeToo movement is incredibly important. What it has achieved so far has been necessary… how we educate our sons and daughters is what will be important going forward.

Why did you feel the need to contribute to the #MeToo conversation with ‘No Means No’?

The MeToo movement is incredibly important. What it has achieved so far has been necessary, but there’s still a long way to go.

For some reason, the themes that inspire me and have inspired me since I started writing are very similar to these movements. But that is because these problems have been going on for generations.

The conversation needs to change at a very basic level. How we educate our sons and daughters is what will be important going forward.

We need to teach them well. Teach them to have respect for their fellow human beings, regardless of gender.

How would you describe your style of music?

I’m not a fan of pigeon-holing music, as I believe a good artist is constantly evolving.

But in saying that, my music could currently be classed as baroque pop which is a fusion genre, combining rock/pop elements with classical elements.

What advice would you offer a young aspiring singer-songwriter?

Practice. Master your instrument.

What is the biggest risk you’ve ever taken?

Deciding to pursue my dream of being a singer-songwriter.

Which of your many shows and appearances are you are most proud of?

I am very proud of my most recent show in Naas, which was part of the Midsummer Arts Festival. We played in this beautiful chapel, where the acoustics were sublime and the guys on sound were amazing too.

I played with a string quartet and my band. We had only one rehearsal, and the result was fantastic! It was a musical journey and everyone really enjoyed the show.

Overall, what has been your proudest career moment to date?

To be honest there have been quite a few this year! Probably hearing my songs on the radio, and the amazing response I have been getting from people who genuinely love and appreciate the music. That’s very cool.

When it comes to dressing for performances I find it really enjoyable. I like to rock it up and then throw in some sparkle for a bit of glam.

What is the most treasured item in your wardrobe?

My Chanel 2.55 bag. It was an anniversary present, so its sentimental value far outweighs it’s actual value.

When it comes to dressing for performances how do you approach style?

I love fashion, so when it comes to dressing for performances I find it really enjoyable.

I like to rock it up and then throw in some sparkle for a bit of glam.

Hair and makeup are an essential part of the process too. I always consider the whole look as opposed to one element.

What are your top three beauty essentials?

It’s kinda boring but… water, sunscreen and a good nights’ sleep! You can’t go wrong there.

What are you favourite ways to keep fit?

Exercise is a very essential part of my life, and I thoroughly enjoy it! I do strength and conditioning a few times a week, some pilates and walking or swimming.

What’s your greatest food pleasure?

I love food! Freshly baked bread is a major pleasure. Also, a good steak.

Where are your favourite places to eat and drink?

We are so lucky to have such a fantastic food scene here in Ireland now. Our produce in Ireland is second to none. We easily hold our own with any major food destination.

Forrest Avenue, Coppinger Row, Caviston’s and Two Cooks are just a few of my favourite places to eat.

What’s your favourite way to switch off?

Spending time with my loved ones.

What would I tell my 16 year-old self? Have faith that your hard work will pay off. What’s meant for you won’t pass you by.

If you could tell your 16 year-old self anything what would it be?

Have faith that your hard work will pay off, and don’t worry about the future so much. What’s meant for you won’t pass you by.

Can you share any plans you have in the pipeline?

I will be heading back into studio soon to record some more new material. And I have more gigs planned too. There’s lots of excitement on the horizon.

 
You can follow Blaithín Carney on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. For more information visit carney.ie.

Article by Erica Bracken. You can follow Erica on Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn.


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